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This blog is to highlight the unjust persecution of legitimate non-TV users at the hands of TV Licensing. These people do not require a licence and are entitled to live without the unnecessary stress and inconvenience caused by TV Licensing's correspondence and employees.

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Sunday, 28 June 2020

BBC Launches TV Licensing Guilt Tripping Campaign


The BBC plans on using leaflets to guilt trip people into paying the £157.50 annual TV licence fee.

According to a BBC insider the leaflets will display the pompous tag line: "Do the right thing - buy a TV licence". The new leaflets signify a shift in tone from the threats and innuendo usually employed in the name of TV licence enforcement.

The Corporation - which announced a £100 million creative diversity programme less than a week ago - hopes to raise a paltry £1 million by emotionally blackmailing people into buying a TV licence.

The BBC is infuriated that many people without a TV licence happily pay for Netflix (try free for a month) and Amazon Prime Instant Video (try free for a month) every month. It has hired a top London advertising agency in an effort to tap into this potentially lucrative on-demand market.

The national broadcaster is seemingly oblivious to the fact that people willingly pay for on-demand services because of the far superior value, breadth and quality on offer. That's a far cry from the BBC business model, which relies on people being coerced into paying for dross.

Tory MP Andrew Bridgen, a long-time opponent of the TV licence, said: "It is good that they will be nudging people rather than threatening them. But it is a flawed argument by the BBC because if you have Netflix you're happy to pay for it rather than being forced to."

A BBC source said: "It's a real break from the past, and adverts showing detector vans and threats about not paying.

"The aim now is to get people to do the right thing, morally, and to adopt a softer line. The leaflets or emails will tell people if they are happy to pay for Netflix or Amazon, then they should also be paying for the BBC."

People should strongly object to the BBC's arrogant implication that they are morally inferior by adopting a lifestyle where they have no legal need for a TV licence.

Morally inferior is BBC bosses pissing away public money left, right and centre and turning a blind eye to decades of child sexual abuse going on right under their noses.

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2 comments:

marcostandy said...

"The aim now is to get people to do the right thing, morally, and to adopt a softer line. The leaflets or emails will tell people if they are happy to pay for Netflix or Amazon, then they should also be paying for the BBC."

They never miss a trick do they?
Netflix and Amazon do not require a tv licence so why would their viewers buy one?

Anonymous said...

"The aim now is to get people to do the right thing, morally, and to adopt a softer line. The leaflets or emails will tell people if they are happy to pay for Netflix or Amazon, then they should also be paying for the BBC."

They never miss a trick do they?
Netflix and Amazon do not require a tv licence so why would their viewers buy one?