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This blog is to highlight the unjust persecution of legitimate non-TV users at the hands of TV Licensing. These people do not require a licence and are entitled to live without the unnecessary stress and inconvenience caused by TV Licensing's correspondence and employees.

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Monday, 12 April 2021

BBC Complaints on Duke of Edinburgh Coverage Top 100,000

The BBC has received more than 100,000 complaints about its blanket coverage of the death of His Royal Highness, The Duke of Edinburgh.

The Duke sadly passed away last Friday, 9th April 2021. We naturally offer our condolences to the Royal Family, who will no doubt be feeling the anguish of bereavement as much as any other family.

As soon as Buckingham Palace made the announcement last Friday morning the BBC suspended its normal schedules and simulcast coverage of the breaking story on BBC One, BBC Two, BBC News Channel and BBC Parliament.

We tweeted at the time: "WTF is going on with the bone idle scheduling of the BBC?"

Whilst it is understood and accepted that the reporting of such a significant news event merits interruption to the normal BBC schedules, it does not merit exactly the same sound and images being simultaneously broadcast on multiple BBC channels for hours on end.

In 2021 everyone in the UK who chooses to indulge in television can access the full range of BBC channels available. If they want to watch wall-to-wall Duke of Edinburgh tributes they can tune into the BBC News Channel, which is the appropriate outlet for such programmes. We're not in the 1950s any more, with families huddled around a TV set tuned only to a single BBC channel.

It is not beyond the wit of man that the technical wizards at the BBC could have placed a strap at the bottom of BBC One and BBC Two programmes saying something like "For the latest breaking news on the sad death of the Duke of Edinburgh tune into the BBC News Channel".

That message could have been displayed for 30 seconds every 10 minutes without disturbing people's normal viewing habits and pointing them in the right direction if they did want to view more.

Former BBC newsreader and legend Simon McCoy agreed with our observations, tweeting: "BBC One and BBC Two showing the same thing. And presumably the News Channel too. Why?

"I know this is a huge event. But surely the public deserve a choice of programming?"

The BBC is not due to publish the official number of complaints until Thursday.

It defended its coverage, saying: "We are proud of our coverage and the role we play during moments of national significance."

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Monday, 5 April 2021

BBC Investigate Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em Comment

The BBC has just concluded an investigation into claims by some snowflake of a viewer that an episode of Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em contained homophobic language.

The 1975 Christmas special of the hit comedy series, "Learning to Drive", was recently repeated on BBC Two.

At one stage during the episode the protagonist, Frank Spencer, ended up working in the Santa's grotto of a large department store.

During the scene Frank said to a young boy: "I'm the chief of the pixies, I'm the friend of all the little boys and girls."

Quick as a flash, the cocky young whippersnapper replied: "Oh no you're not. You're a poof."

The offending word prompted a complaint from the overly-sensitive keyboard warrior, despite a warning of "outdated language" being broadcast immediately beforehand.

Quite why the viewer found the word "pixies" so offensive is beyond me, with even the woke national broadcaster - never one to miss pandering to a minority group - decreeing that actually the programme didn't breach editorial guidelines.

A BBC spokesman said: "Attitudes and language change over time and our approach is to tell viewers when a show includes something that may be offensive, inappropriate or outdated."

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Sunday, 4 April 2021

BBC Spends Fortune on Presenter Dan Walker's Taxi Fares

BBC News and Sport presenter Dan Walker has been accused of racking up a fortune in taxi fares.

Katie Hind, writing in the Mail on Sunday, claims that the newspaper has seen evidence confirming that Walker regularly takes £200-a-time taxi journeys between his Sheffield home and BBC Media City at Salford Quays.

In December 2019 The Sun first published claims that Walker, who earns £260,000 a year, was regularly using taxis for the 78 mile return journey. The BBC Breakfast and Football Focus presenter angrily hit back at the claims, saying on Twitter that critics should "stop reading and believing rubbish in newspapers".

According to Hind, newly released BBC documents show that Walker has indeed been using taxis for the journey for the last 6 months, with insiders claiming it has been a longstanding arrangement prior to that.

The taxi is booked to pick him up in Sheffield at 3.45 am and collect him from Media City for the return journey at 9.30 am.

Although the expense is undeniable, a quick glance at the relevant BBC Expenses policy seems to suggest that Walker's use of taxis is just about within the rules.

The policy states: "If you have no means of getting to and from work in the early morning (start or finish time before 06.30) or late at night (start or finish time after 22.45), the BBC can provide transport, within 40 actual miles from your normal place of employment."

Walker's home is just under 40 miles from Media City.

The policy adds that for taxi journeys beyond 40 miles the employee might be asked for a contribution towards the cost.

A BBC spokesperson said: "Our presenters know our policies on travel and accommodation costs and anything outside of BBC policy is paid for by themselves."

Walker, speaking on Twitter earlier this morning, said: "I personally pay for any taxis outside the ones permitted to get to work at 3.45 am and I drive myself one day a week."

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